Introduction:

The plate is a thick piece of metal containing holes and is used along with screws for insertion in the human body to treat bone fractures. Plates and screws help to hold the broken bones together and thus help in the healing of the fracture.

The surgeon may remove the loose fragments and realign the bones as much as possible. A surgical plate is then attached to the broken bone that not only supports but also compresses the region of the fracture. This results in faster bone healing.

Injury to Facial Bones:

An injury to the face may damage the facial bony structures. The most common among all these are the nasal bones and the septum (a wall like structure separating the nostrils). The worst part of facial bone damage is that injury occurring to one particular part also disrupts other supporting facial skeleton. For instance, an injury to nasal septum may extend to the bony structures surrounding eyeballs or for that reason, even teeth.

The surgical treatment for such facial damage includes repairing soft tissues and damaged structures with the help of plates and screws.

Plates Play Important Role In Fixing Cheekbone:

The cheekbone protects the eyeball and supports it from below. The bone is also linked to the side of the upper jaw and nose as well. The cosmetic surgery may involve fixing small metal plates and screws to keep the cheekbone in place. Putting such plates and screws requires one or more alternative incisions such as a cut made closer to outer part of the end of the eyebrow or inside the mouth through the gum. 

In spite of fracture being joined correctly using special plates and screws; it may still take approximately one and a half month for the cheekbone to completely heal. Also, if it is completely mandatory to put plates in the cheekbone for holding structures properly, they are not generally removed unless they get infected. The metal used in facial surgical plate is titanium that does not escape the metal detectors used at places like airports.

Types of Surgical Facial Plates:

The types of surgical facial plates depend upon the type of surgeries. There are different implant plates for micro surgery, facial surgery and mandible (jaw) surgery and many others. Let’s look some of the common surgical facial plates…

Facial Surgical Plates for Micro Surgery includes…

  • Micro Straight Plate with and without bridge
  • Micro Orbital Plate with and without bridge
  • Micro L and T Plate
  • Micro I Plate with 4-6 holes
  • Micro Angled Plate
  • Micro X and Y Plate
  • Micro Double Plate with and without bridge
  • Micro Z Plate

(Note: Generally, micro surgical facial plates come with the thickness of 1.5 mm and options are available for different numbers of holes like 4 or 6 holes).

Facial Surgical Plates in general includes…

  • Straight Plate with and without bridge
  • Orbital Plate with and without bridge
  • L and T Plates with and without bridge
  • I Plate with 4-6 holes
  • Angled Plates
  • X and Y Plates with and without bridge
  • Z plates

(Note: Generally, facial surgical plates in general come with 2.0 mm of thickness and options are there for different numbers of holes like 4-6 holes).

Facial Surgical Plates for Mandible Surgery includes…

  • Straight reconstruction plate
  • Angled reconstruction plate
  • DCP
  • LCDCP AND EDCP (Eccentric Dynamic Compression)
  • Mandible Reconstruction Plate

(Note: Facial surgical plates for mandible surgery vary in thickness and the options generally are available in 2.4mm, 2.7mm and 2.0mm).

References:

  • A service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine: www.medilineplus.com
  • Health on Net: www.hon.net
  • Wikipedia

Medical Terms: http://www.med.wayne.edu